Sewage Water Treatment Technology
» Sewage Water Treatment Page ID : WP2411 | Last Updated 27 Nov, 2021, 07:44AM
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Water Recycle Management

Water recycling is a process of reusing treated wastewater for beneficial purposes such as agricultural and landscape irrigation, industrial processes, toilet flushing, and replenishing a ground water basin. BAS Enterprises is the Leader in setting up water recycling for Industries, Government sectors, hotels, houses etc with ease and in low cost. 

How Can Recycled Water Benefit Us?

Water is very important for every living things including plants and animals. Water level in ground is decreasing rapidly due to rapid use and incapebility of recharge. Now a days we obtain water from rivers which are not sufficient. If we reuse water after treatment in various purpose, we will win from water deficiency.

What are the Environmental Benefits of Water Recycling?

Recycled water can satisfy most water demands, as long as it is adequately treated to ensure water quality appropriate for the use. ecycled water is most commonly used for nonpotable (not for drinking) purposes, such as agriculture, landscape, public parks, and golf course irrigation. Other nonpotable applications include cooling water for power plants and oil refineries, industrial process water for such facilities as paper mills and carpet dyers, toilet flushing, dust control, construction activities, concrete mixing, and artificial lakes.

Water Recycling Can Decrease Diversion of Freshwater from Sensitive Ecosystems

Plants, wildlife, and fish depend on sufficient water flows to their habitats to live and reproduce. The lack of adequate flow, as a result of diversion for agricultural, urban, and industrial purposes, can cause deterioration of water quality and ecosystem health. People who reuse water  can supplement their demands by using a reliable source of recycled water, which can free considerable amounts of water for the environment and increase flows to vital ecosystems


Water Recycling Can Reduce and Prevent Pollution

When pollutant discharges to oceans, rivers, and other water bodies are curtailed, the pollutant loadings to these bodies are decreased. Moreover, in some cases, substances that can be pollutants when discharged to a body of water can be beneficially reused for irrigation. For example, recycled water may contain higher levels of nutrients, such as nitrogen, than potable water. Application of recycled water for agricultural and landscape irrigation can provide an additional source of nutrients and lessen the need to apply synthetic fertilizers.

Recycling Water Can Save Energy

As the demand for water grows, more water is extracted, treated, and transported sometimes over great distances which can require a lot of energy. If the local source of water is ground water, the level of ground water becomes lower as more water is removed and this increases the energy required to pump the water to the surface.  Recycling water on site or nearby reduces the energy needed to move water longer distances or pump water from deep within an aquifer. Tailoring water quality to a specific water use also reduces the energy needed to treat water.  The water quality required to flush a toilet is less stringent than the water quality needed for drinking water and requires less energy to achieve

What Is The Future Of Water Recycling?

Water recycling has proven to be effective and successful in creating a new and reliable water supply without compromising public health.  Nonpotable reuse is a widely accepted practice that will continue to grow.  However, in many parts of the India, the uses of recycled water are expanding in order to accommodate the needs of the environment and growing water supply demands. Advances in wastewater treatment technology and health studies of indirect potable reuse have led many to predict that planned indirect potable reuse will soon become more common. Recycling waste and gray water requires far less energy than treating salt water using a desalination system.

While water recycling is a sustainable approach and can be cost-effective in the long term, the treatment of wastewater for reuse and the installation of distribution systems at centralized facilities can be initially expensive compared to such water supply alternatives as imported water, ground water, or the use of gray water onsite from homes. Institutional barriers, as well as varying agency priorities and public misperception, can make it difficult to implement water recycling projects. Finally, early in the planning process, agencies must reach out to the public to address any concerns and to keep the public informed and involved in the planning process.

As water energy demands and environmental needs grow, water recycling will play a greater role in our overall water supply. By working together to overcome obstacles, water recycling, along with water conservation and efficiency, can help us to sustainably manage our vital water resources.

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